This site requires Javascript. Please enable Javascript in your browser for this site.

School Overview

    • Founded:
    • 1209
    • Size:
    • Large (>15,000 students)
    • Type:
    • Public
    • Category:
    • Universities, colleges
    • Specialization:
    • N/A
    • Climate:
    • Temperate
    • Location:
    • Trinity Lane, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
    • Phone:
    • +441223337733
    • Setting:
    • Urban

The History of University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.

The University of Cambridge has 31 self-governing colleges and over 150 departments, faculties, schools, syndicates and other institutions. It also has around 20,000 students yearly and offers 39 courses ranging from arts, physical sciences, and social sciences.

The mission of the University of Cambridge is to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning, and research at the highest international levels of excellence.

Academic Highlights

Cambridge has 31 colleges, of which three, Murray Edwards, Newnham and Lucy Cavendish, admit women only. The other colleges are mixed, though most were originally all-male. Darwin was the first college to admit both men and women, while Churchill, Clare, and King's were the first previously all-male colleges to admit female undergraduates, in 1972. Magdalene became the last all-male college to accept women, in 1988. Clare Hall and Darwin admit only postgraduates, and Hughes Hall, Lucy Cavendish, St Edmund's and Wolfson admit only mature (i.e. 21 years or older on date of matriculation) students, encompassing both undergraduate and graduate students. All other colleges admit both undergraduate and postgraduate students with no age restrictions.

Life in University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.

The University of Cambridge has 31 self-governing colleges and over 150 departments, faculties, schools, syndicates and other institutions. It also has around 20,000 students yearly and offers 39 courses ranging from arts, physical sciences, and social sciences.

The mission of the University of Cambridge is to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning, and research at the highest international levels of excellence.

Rowing is a particularly popular sport at Cambridge, and there are competitions between colleges, notably the bumps races, and against Oxford, the Boat Race. There are also Varsity matches against Oxford in many other sports, ranging from cricket and rugby, to chess and tiddlywinks. Athletes representing the university in certain sports are entitled to apply for a Cambridge Blue at the discretion of the Blues Committee, consisting of the captains of the thirteen most prestigious sports. There is also the self-described "unashamedly elite" Hawks' Club, which is for men only, whose membership is usually restricted to Cambridge Full Blues and Half Blues.The Ospreys are the equivalent female club.

School Ranking

According to the 2016 Complete University Guide, the University of Cambridge is ranked first amongst the UK's universities; this ranking is based on a broad raft of criteria from entry standards and student satisfaction to quality of teaching in specific subjects and job prospects for graduates. The University is ranked as the 2nd best university in the UK for the quality of graduates according to recruiters from the UK's major companies.

Admissions

Undergraduate applications to Cambridge must be made through UCAS in time for the early deadline, currently mid-October in the year before starting. Until the 1980s candidates for all subjects were required to sit special entrance examinations, since replaced by additional tests for some subjects, such as the Thinking Skills Assessment and the Cambridge Law Test. The university is considering reintroducing an admissions exam for all subjects with effect from 2016. The university gave offers of admission to 33.5% of its applicants in 2016, the 2nd lowest amongst the Russell Group, behind Oxford. The acceptance rate for students in the 2018–2019 cycle was 18.8%.

Most applicants who are called for interview will have been predicted at least three A-grade A-level qualifications relevant to their chosen undergraduate course, or the equivalent in other qualifications, such as getting at least 7,7,6 for higher-level subjects at IB. The A* A-level grade (introduced in 2010) now plays a part in the acceptance of applications, with the university's standard offer for most courses being set at A*AA,with A*A*A for sciences courses. Due to a high proportion of applicants receiving the highest school grades, the interview process is needed for distinguishing between the most able candidates. The interview is performed by College Fellows, who evaluate candidates on unexamined factors such as potential for original thinking and creativity. For exceptional candidates, a Matriculation Offer was sometimes previously offered, requiring only two A-levels at grade E or above. In 2006, 5,228 students who were rejected went on to get 3 A levels or more at grade A, representing about 63% of all applicants rejected. The Sutton Trust maintains that Oxford University and Cambridge University recruit disproportionately from 8 schools which accounted for 1,310 Oxbridge places during three years, contrasted with 1,220 from 2,900 other schools.

Notable Alumni

Among the most famous of Cambridge natural philosophers is Sir Isaac Newton, who conducted many of his experiments in the grounds of Trinity College. Others are Sir Francis Bacon, who was responsible for the development of the scientific method and the mathematicians John Dee and Brook Taylor. Pure mathematicians include G. H. Hardy, John Edensor Littlewood and Augustus De Morgan; Sir Michael Atiyah, a specialist in geometry; William Oughtred, inventor of the logarithmic scale; John Wallis, first to state the law of acceleration; Srinivasa Ramanujan, the self-taught genius who made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series and continued fractions; and James Clerk Maxwell, who brought about the "second great unification of physics" (the first being accredited to Newton) with his classical theory of electromagnetic radiation. In 1890, mathematician Philippa Fawcett was the person with the highest score in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos exams, but as a woman was unable to take the title of 'Senior Wrangler'.

Acceptance Rate

The acceptance rate for students in the 2018–2019 cycle was 18.8%.

Other Campuses
No other campus yet.
People who this school